Autistic People Can Be Ableist Asses Too
marjaerwin
I was commenting on the impracticality of special identification. I wrote:

I'm autistic, trans, and multiply disabled. How on earth am I supposed to get through the bureaucracy? For example, there is a local dmv, but it isn't accessible, due to noise and flashing lights; there are other local government offices, but they aren't accessible, the area was impassible the last time I tried running errands in that direction, and they require phone calls.


I have sensory processing issues. I have a diagnosis for hyperacusis, but not for the other issues. I focus on strobe lights below, instead of painhammers.

Someone else, insisting on special identification for trans people, wrote:

i also am on the autism spectrum (Aspergers syndrome to be exact) yet somehow i can still get to the dmv just fine despite the noise and annoyance of people talking too loud. i dont shut down when a light flashes nor is a phone call an obstacle in the slightest. also its federal regulation that public buildings are accessible to the handicapped. sounds to me like you are trying play a victim complex as an excuse for you not to do something.


I really don’t want to go into all that’s wrong with that. But.

Most epileptics aren't strobe sensitive. That doesn't mean no epileptics are.

Most autistics aren't strobe-sensitive. That doesn't mean no autistics are. I know I am. I have had a number of close calls. I have ended up in the street after being hit by strobe lights from two directions at once.

I have a combination of sensory processing differences, to begin with, and chronic illness causing sensory hypersensitivity, and also causing migraines after sensory bombardment. It’s possible to be autistic, and something else, and it’s possible for the three aspects, allistic society, autism, and other conditions, to interact.

And government doesn't do accessibility. If they did, they wouldn't use so many strobe lights, flourescent lights, and painhammers everywhere.

I get hit with agonizing and migraine-inducing sensory bombardment, that tends to be worse than the times I’ve been beaten with fists and feet and improvised clubs, almost every day. I’m not “playing a victim complex.” I’m an actual victim trying to survive and with no idea how to escape. This kind of dismissiveness is ableist, and it allows people to ignore violence, and it is literally adding insult to injury.

Maybe it's the Salicylates?
marjaerwin
I am suffering severe chronic illness, including sensory hypersensitivity, migraines, nerve pain, joint pain, itching, and post-exertional malaise. I suspect fibromyalgia. I have been tested for multiple sclerosis, lupus, and Lyme disease. I am not a doctor, just another sufferer trying to make sense of it.

One proposed treatment for fibromyalgia involves going off salicylates and going on guaifenesin. Dr. Paul St. Amand suggests that excess phosphate can cause fibromyalgia, and that without salicylates, guaifenesin can help the body emove phosphates and recover from fibromyalgia. It's certainly tempting. It's not something that's performed better than the placebo, though, in clinical trials.

http://www.fibromyalgiatreatment.com/

I have had kidney issues since I was a kid. I have also had trouble with gout-like joint issues, as mentioned above. Since I am on estrogen and I do not drink alcohol, I have practically no risk for either gout or pseudogout, and I don't know what else could cause these symptoms. So although clinical studies haven’t shown guaifenesin to be any better *for the average fibro patient* than placebos, I figured, if multiple conditions can lead to fibro symptoms and the guaifenesin protocol treats some conditions, it might be better *for me* than nothing.

I tend to vomit after exposure to mint, and have bad reactions, though I've forgotten what, after exposure to aspirin and aloe vera. It was a surprise to realize that the tea, which I drank so much of, was chemically related to these poisons.

I have gone off salicylates, figuring that might help in itself, and gone on guaifenesin, doubting it would help but needing to try.

However, while looking up salicylate intolerance/salicylate sensitivity and fibro, I stumbled across another article, which might make more sense of things.

Mark London argues against the phosphate theory, and suggests that magnesium deficiency and/or salicylate exposure could explain many fibro symptoms, and that guaifenesin's effect as a muscle relaxant and pain reliever could explain some of the other effects.

http://web.mit.edu/london/www/guai.html

(no subject)
marjaerwin
“Big Government Won’t Let Us Use the Government to Out and Endanger Trans People”

*headdesk*

The right wing seem to hold that state-sponsored discrimination, harassment, and violence against marginalized groups isn’t “big government,” and that trying to limit state-sponsored discrimination, harassment, and violence against anyone except themselves is “big government.”

example:

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/markmeckler/2016/4/big-business-and-big-government-threaten-north-carolina-residents-over-bathroom-law/

Cultural Chauvinism
marjaerwin
I am tired of cultural chauvinists who insist that every good value and every new technology comes from the “west,” apparently unaware of how much comes from elsewhere, while dencouncing everyone else for being cultural relativists.

No one is absolutely relativist, but it helps to be somewhat relativist, and to try to understand societies in their members’ terms. Especially if, like Boaz, you are an anthropologist.

Now as far as it goes many key technologies have come from the west, in the past couple hundred years. Part of that is because of the mutually-reinforcing coal-mining and machine-building industries in mid-modern Britain. Part of that is because of trade connections around the world. But to me, those seem like luck, rather than proof of “western” superiority.

And as for values, the important ones, such as freedom and equality, have never been unique to the “west,” and are under threat from anti-immigrant movements and other authoritarian movements in the “west.”
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Noise Paralysis
marjaerwin
The thing about noise paralysis is that you can’t walk away from noise paralysis. It may not be complete paralysis. I can usually bring my hands to my ear protection, crouch, or if in in extreme pain, curl up on the ground. But I can’t walk or even crawl like that. It doesn’t have to be complete paralysis to trap me and possibly endanger me.

P.S. I can’t find anything else about this online.

Touchscreens aren't Accessible for All, and External Controllers aren't a Solution
marjaerwin
I have proprioceptive issues, so it's hard to use touchscreens without triggering unwanted gestures. And zooming animation can trigger unwanted migraines. I can't use phones, but touchscreens are also common among tablets, e-readers, and even pharmacy checkouts.

I have tried using the Ipega 9023 as an external controller for certain tablets. It doesn't work as an accessibility tool. I have to start the device and use the touchscreen to establish the bluetooth connection to the controller. And it's very hard to establish any working connection.

I think, for external controllers to become a solution, they will need physical connections to the devices, rather than unreliable bluetooth connections, they will need to work while loading, rather than after loading and using the touchscreen to establish a connection, and they will need to be able to work for all functions. A couple extra ports for accessibility tools would help. I also think operating systems should stop hammering their users with animation. Android has dev tools to disable animation, but they don't actually disable animation.

Browser Accessibility, So Far
marjaerwin
I have sensory processing disorder, coordination issues, chronic migraines, and rsi. I have yet to find a remotely accessible web browser.

Links: ? Site is relatively clear, but installation instructions are intimidating.

Safari: D. Few accessibility extensions. Requires users to toggle cookie and Javascript settings.

Firefox: D. Intense flashing everywhere. More accessibility extensions, but none block built-in flashing. Allows users to whitelist cookies. Requires users to toggle Javascript settings.

Opera: F. Intense zooming everywhere. Kill it with fire.

Vivaldi: F. Intense zooming everywhere. Kill it with fire.

Slepinir: F. Intense zooming everywhere. Kill it with fire.

Chrome: I. Intense animation on website. Cannot use website without Javascript. Cannot use website with Javascript, because animation.

Lynx: I. Unreadable website.

Good Ways to Keep in Touch? And to Ask for Help?
marjaerwin
I've been using Tumblr, but it's really painfully inaccessible, and requires Javascript, and special video-blockers, and so on.

It's good that things are rebloggable, but that's about all that's good about it.

I'm unable to use Skype at this point.

I'm sick - in pain - and naseous - of the way internet standards and web browsers enable so many painful features without including corresponding accessibility tools to block those features.

A pox on tooltips, animation, zooming, sheering, javascript which enables these, flashing menus, google pain, firefox, safari, opera, vivaldi, sleipnir, and the rest.

Who Voted for the Iraq War?
marjaerwin
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iraq_Resolution

I have sensory processing disorder and can’t vote anyway, regardless of the morality of voting at all.

Here’s the thing.

I read over the Powell Presentation, examined the photos, and saw that the photos didn’t show the new construction, at old chemical weapons sites, that they were supposed to show.

People died because of that war. It’s not something to be taken lightly.

I am an ordinary civilian. I didn’t have enough evidence to know whether Saddam Hussein’s regime still had effective chemical weapons stocks, but I did have enough evidence to know that George W. Bush’s administration were lying.

Would you give someone a weapon if you knew they were lying about why they were asking?

Would you give someone an authorization for military force if you had enough information to know they were lying about why they were asking?
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(no subject)
marjaerwin
I doubt that any legal system could estimate compensation for backup beepers, strobe lights, etc. Since we can't get into each other's heads, we can't assess how severe the effects are, how hard avoiding them is, etc. Since we tend to have ableist prejudices, we tend to dismiss these issues.

But the current legal system doesn't even try to provide compensation for these things.

Nor does it try to limit the use of these things on public roads, in public spaces, or within range of nonconsenting people's homes.

Instead it mandates these things.

?

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